Articles on: General

How to Diagnose Network & Latency issues

Introduction:
Understanding network performance is crucial for maintaining smooth operations in the digital realm. One invaluable tool for diagnosing network issues is the My traceroute (MTR) report. MTR provides detailed insights into the path and performance of packets traveling across a network, helping pinpoint where problems might occur. In this guide, we'll walk you through the process of generating and interpreting an MTR report to troubleshoot network issues effectively.

Troubleshooting Network Latency with WinMTR



Generating an MTR Report on Windows:

Install WinMTR: Start by downloading and installing WinMTR, a Windows-based graphical interface for MTR. You can find the latest version of WinMTR on various software download websites or the official WinMTR GitHub repository.

- Source: You can download WinMTR from the WinMTR GitHub repository. Navigate to the releases section, and download the latest version as a ZIP file. Extract the contents and run the executable to install WinMTR on your Windows system.

Launch WinMTR: Once installed, launch WinMTR from your Start menu or desktop shortcut.

Enter the Destination: In the "Host" field, enter the IP address or domain name of the destination you want to trace the route to.

Start the Trace: Click on the "Start" button to begin the tracing process. WinMTR will start sending packets to the specified destination and display real-time statistics.


MTR Start Trace

Analyze the Results: Once WinMTR completes its run, it will display a table showing the route to the destination and various metrics such as latency, packet loss, and the number of hops. Analyze this information carefully to identify any patterns or anomalies that may indicate network issues.


MTR Result Packets Sent

Interpreting an MTR Report on Windows:

- Hop: Each row in the WinMTR report represents a router (or hop) along the path from your local system to the destination.
- Loss%: Indicates the percentage of packets lost at each hop. High packet loss can indicate network congestion or hardware issues.
- Sent: The number of packets sent to each hop.
- Last, Avg, Best, Worst: These columns display the latency (in milliseconds) for the last, average, best, and worst packet round-trip times to each hop.


Linux:

Generating an MTR Report on Linux:

Install MTR: If you haven't already, install MTR on your Linux system using your distribution's package manager. For example, on Ubuntu or Debian-based systems, you can install MTR using the following command:
sudo apt-get install mtr


Launch MTR: Open a terminal window and type mtr followed by the destination IP address or domain name. For example:
mtr example.com


Generate the Report: MTR will start sending packets to the specified destination and display real-time statistics. You can adjust the number of packets sent using the -c flag followed by the desired number of packets.

Analyze the Results: Once MTR completes its run, it will display a table similar to the one generated on Windows. Analyze the information to identify any network issues.

Interpreting an MTR Report on Linux:

- Hop: Each row in the MTR report represents a router (or hop) along the path from your local system to the destination.
- Loss%: Indicates the percentage of packets lost at each hop.
- Snt: The number of packets sent to each hop.
- Last, Avg, Best, Wrst: These columns display the latency (in milliseconds) for the last, average, best, and worst packet round-trip times to each hop.



Troubleshooting Network Latency with Traceroute



Traceroute, commonly abbreviated as tracert, serves as a valuable tool in pinpointing latency issues within a network. By executing a tracert command, you can discern where the delay occurs between your device and the server. The duration of the delay, measured in milliseconds (ms), directly correlates with the time it takes for the request to reach its destination. Ideally, you aim to maintain this latency as minimal as possible.


To initiate a tracert, access your command line terminal (CMD) and input the following command:

tracert <IP address>


For instance, a typical tracert command might resemble:

tracert 191.96.94.100


Ensure that you exclude any port numbers from the IP address.

Upon executing the tracert command, you'll obtain a result similar to the following:


Traceroute



Conclusion:
Taking an MTR report on both Windows and Linux systems is essential for diagnosing and troubleshooting network issues effectively. By understanding how to generate and interpret MTR reports, you can identify and resolve network problems quickly, ensuring optimal performance for your applications and services. Whether you're using Windows or Linux, MTR remains a valuable tool in your network troubleshooting arsenal.

Need Help?

Should you require further assistance, don't hesitate to reach out to our support team at: FREAKHOSTING Support.

Updated on: 13/03/2024

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